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Edgar Cayce 
(1877-1945)

 

For most of his adult life, Edgar Cayce was able to provide intuitive insights into nearly any question imaginable. When individuals came to him with a question, he would place himself into a sleep-induced sleep state. While in that state he could respond to virtually any question asked. His responses have come to be called "readings". Today his psychic readings constitute one of the largest and most impressive records of intuitive information to emanate from a single individual.

Cayce was born on a farm near Hopkinsville, Kentucky. At an early age he gave evidence of his budding talent: he was able to master his school lessons by sleeping on his books. At the age of twenty-one he developed a gradual throat paralysis which threatened the loss of his voice. When doctors were unable to find a cause for his condition, Cayce entered the same hypnotic sleep that had enabled him to learn his school lessons years before. In that state, he was able to recommend a cure which successfully repaired his throat muscles and restored his voice. It was soon discovered that he could do the same for others.

For many years the information dealt mainly with medical problems. Eventually the scope of his readings expanded to include such topics as meditation, dreams, reincarnation, and prophecy. The transcripts have provided the basis for over 300 popular books about Cayce's work.

Cayce would eventually give over 14,000 readings on more than 10,000 different topics to people all over the world. These readings continue to be researched and written about over half a century after his death and are available to students, writers, researchers, medical professionals, and A.R.E. members the world over.

There are two hospitals in the U.S. using Cayce's health prescriptions, and numerous books on the man and his over 14,000 readings. (On a personal note: My father, a surgeon, was fascinated with Cayce and read all of the works published on him at the time.)

For more information on Edgar Cayce and A.R.E., go to http://www.are-cayce.com/edgar.htm. 

For a scholarly review of Cayce's life and work, http://www.ciis.edu/cayce/harmon.html