First Do No Harm

Bachelor Thai Stir-fry

Being a Bachelor recipe, you won’t find many measurements here, just some good ideas to smack your taste buds around and put real healthy nutrition into your body.

Ingredients:

Note: The veggies you use are up to you. We've listed them in the order of their "hardness" so you can add them to the recipe in that order.

Hard veggies: carrots, beets (these make your stir-fry colorful and there are a variety of beets), rutabaga, celery root, parsnips, Jerusalem artichoke, and any of the winter squashes, cut up into small chunks.

Medium veggies: cauliflower, broccoli, broccoflower (hybrid mixture of cauliflower and broccoli), snap peas, green beans, yellow beans, Brussels sprouts.

Soft veggies: summer squash, zucchini, celery, snow peas (optional to remove ends and stringy edges, but should be blanched for a minute prior to being tossed into the stir-fry) and don't forget some leafy additions: kale, chard, bok choi, and Chinese cabbage. Coconut Milk, Unsweetened, Organic, 14 oz.

Garlic, Onion, Ginger Root, Curry Powder (Turmeric, Cumin).

Note: when you use Turmeric, it is also good to toss in a bit of black pepper. Why? The combination increases your body's absorption of the Turmeric 1000 times.

Flour or Arrow Root Powder for thickening.

Thai Kitchen Brand Green Curry Paste and/or Roasted Red Chili Paste.

Coconut Milk (Coconut Cream), Coconut Oil. One of my personal favorites is Native Forest Organic (photo to the right) because I can order it by the case at my local co-p, but Wilderness Family Naturals has some great ways to get your coconut milk. They've got coconut cream that you can thin with coconut water or filtered water and they have powdered coconut milk that you can make as thick or as thin as you wish. Go check them out.

Mushrooms: My favorites are Shitake, Mitake, and the ABM. These are medicinal mushrooms, but you can add others just for taste. Most often they come dehydrated, and you’ll have to rehydrate them. You can do this by adding them to some salt water (Celtic Sea Salt® Brand) in the morning. You can add other things to the water for flavor, such as your teriyaki sauce. Or to quickly rehydrate them, boil up water (or broth) add some salt, and drop them in the water. Rinse, squeeze out the excess water and put aside.

Soy Sauce, Fish Sauce, Bragg Liquid Aminos, or Teriyaki Sauce.

Optional: cayenne pepper, habanera pepper sauce. If you like hot, we've got some great hot sauce recommendations.

We've recently found some research that shows that habanera peppers attack and kill cancer cells. It seems, the hotter the better, so we're going to explain here the differences in hot things.

The "hot" in peppers is measured in Scoville Units.

Here is a table showing the Scoville Units in a variety of hot sauces. Only the serious sauces have links to where you can purchase them. Note that the number of units measured are estimates since each batch can vary from a previous batch.


Tabasco Sauce
Original Formula

2,140 – 5000 SU


Tabasco Brand
Habanera Sauce

7000 - 8000 SU


Jalapeño Pepper

2,500 - 5,000


Cayenne Pepper

30,000 - 50,000 SU


Dave's Original
Insanity Sauce

180,000 SU


Dave's Ultimate
Insanity Sauce

250,000 SU


Blair's Jersey
Death Hot Sauce

 1,100,000 SU


Z Nothing Beyond
Hot Sauce

2 – 4 Million SU

Now, let’s talk about the “medium” upon which you’ll serve this recipe.

White rice is about as nutritious as white bread. Remember Wonder Bread? It’s a wonder we survived.

Brown rice is better than white, but still most brands are over-processed. Buying brown rice in bulk is a good idea, but few realize that it must be refrigerated because it goes rancid quickly.

Kashi is even better since there’s a lot of roughage in it.

The Vietnamese love to put their stir-fry over noodles, and there are a huge variety of noodles on the market. The only problem with noodles is that they are, for the most part, empty calories, and high in carbs. Well, I’ve discovered Dreamfield Pasta.  Dreamfield Pasta is not organic, but they are low carb, low glycemic, and contain a bit of fiber so they are filling. When dieting, filling foods are important. 

Finally, you have Quinoa; high in fiber and a complete protein while providing carbs we need. If you use Quinoa, you’ll need to wash it thoroughly (you’ll need a very fine screen to rinse it) and then just cook it up just like rice. You need not use just water when cooking it up, for instance, if you’re making a chicken stir-fry, why not add some chicken broth to your quinoa?

Now, let's make this meal.

In a large frying pan, fill the bottom with lots of coconut oil. Add your initial spices: the Green Curry Paste, or the Roasted Red Chili Paste, or both. You could even substitute curry instead of the pasts, or add some extra curry to the paste. Stir it all well.

Crush the garlic and shave and mince the ginger root. Toss both into the oil and stir it up. Some like a minced onion at this time, so toss that in. Keep in mind, this is a Bachelor's Recipe: everything is cooked by taste and sight.

You can also salt it right now with one of the sauces mentioned above, or a combination, or Celtic Sea Salt, because you’re about to put in the HARD veggies.

You do NOT want to overcook the veggies. Stir and keep the oil hot enough to cook but do NOT let the oils smoke. Under 350 degrees is where you want the temp of the oil to stay.

If you like HOT, this is the time to start adding your hot sauces. You'll add a bit to the hard veggies, then to the meat and medium veggies, then the later, as nearly your last step.

Personally, my favorite is the Z Nothing Beyond sauce above. But if you are using really hot sauces, be careful. Wash your hands with soap after you touch the bottle or the top or if you get some on your hands. If you don't wash with soap, you just know you'll touch your eye soon and then you'll regret it. You'll regret it for a very long time.

The hard veggies will take about 3 to 5 minutes.

Next add your meat. When I do chicken, I like the chicken to be already cooked (leftovers are great) and then I shred the chicken into the pan.

If you are using mushrooms, add them with the meat.

Add a bit more of your salty sauce (Braggs or Soy Sauce), some more curry, or hey, get creative and add some of that wine you’re sipping. And add some more hot.

Add the MEDIUM veggies with the meat.  Stir, add a bit more curry and soy sauce (or whatever you’re using).

When the meat is brown, if you’re out of oil at the bottom of the pan, add some more coconut oil and toss in the soft veggies.

You really don’t want to COOK the soft veggies, just warm them.

Again, add some more curry, if you want, some more soy sauce (or whatever), stir everything, mix it all up, get everything wet, then, open that can of Coconut milk and pour it in, stir.

Now, take a taste test, and determine if you want it hotter. If so, another drop or so of your favorite hot sauce. Then add about two tablespoons of Arrow Root Powder, or four tablespoons of flour and whip that into the sauce. If you've used red beets, you'll love the color of it all. Cover for about three minutes while you take the rice, noodles, or quinoa, off the stove and serve it into plates.

ECE

Before serving add some Ecklonia Cava Extract. ECE is a seaweed. Many stir-fries contain seaweed. It's taste is slightly bitter and salty. You can read about ECE here: ECE, but know this: one quarter teaspoon of ECE is equivalent to the antioxidant power of over 10 servings of fruits and vegetables.

Serve your stir-fry and enjoy. When I'm cooking for friends, I usually make an un-hot version, and then serve myself last mixing in my mega-hot sauce. This recipe has received rave reviews, and I've never had a single complaint about it, well, except from one friend who had originally asked for the hot version, took a few bites and said it was very good right before his hair caught on fire and he ran screaming from my home.

Super Breakfast Burrito

Simply take the leftovers from the above stir fry, add a few eggs, heat up in a pan greased with coconut oil and a touch of liquid lecithin and wrap into a tortilla.

 


Articles | Newsletter | Who We Are | Links | Search Site 
Help Us To Help Others
| Online Friends | Prayer List | Find A Practitioner
Help

Contact Us  

© Copyright 2009 Minnesota Wellness Publications, Inc.

For non commercial use: You may copy, print, reprint, and/or transfer this entire article, if and only if it is unmodified and in its complete state with this copyright notice attached and all the links work properly. All others must contact us in writing.